A bear will run from you...lol

Discussion in 'General Hunting' started by Natureboy21, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. Natureboy21

    Natureboy21 Spike

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    Nov 24, 2017
    Kentucky
    Screw around like a tree hugging wussy and see if being like Ghandi. Helps you not to get mauled..I'm sorry, but sweet Jesus you don't have to a genius to understand who's at the top of the food chain
     
  2. Duster

    Duster 12 pointer

    We were on a spring hunt and told to keep a eye out for cow moose more so than bears. They say they will stomp your butt into a mudhole if they feel their calf is in danger. I only seen one cow and she walked out into the trail I was going in on. No calf in tow. She never even looked my way but I sure kept a eye on her until she got out of sight.
     
  3. bondhu

    bondhu 10 pointer

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    I have fished Alaska and Canada and understand the rules on Black, Grizzly and Brown.
    My concern on Ky black bear is the relocation of nuisance bears. Kentucky residents do not understand what steps need to be taken when bears show up. Once they have no fear of humans just like keeping a fawn buck in the old backer barn. Your going to have trouble its just a matter of time.
     
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  4. wprebeck

    wprebeck 10 pointer

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    Yep, black bear are so dangerous, they attack people with no provocation. Why, just look at all the deaths from maulings in TN, NC, MT, ID, AK, etc where there are established populations of bears and hunters that fill the woods every year.
    https://www.google.com/amp/www.wide...bear-attacks-north-america-last-20-years/amp/

    Just over one fatality per year, over the last 20 years. Why, that's almost as bad as being hit by lightning:

    http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/fatalities.shtml

    Hmm...death by venomous snakes (I would venture a guess there are more venomous snakes in the country than bears. Matter of fact, I'd guess there are more copperheads than bears of all species combined)

    http://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/venomous_snake_faqs.shtml

    Should you be cautious around a bear? Sure, you'd be stupid to act any other way. But, all the drama probably isn't necessary. I know a few folks in Alaska from another site - they are active hunters and anglers, yet don't get all bent out of shape about bears the way folks in this thread have.

    And yes, I frequent places where bears have been seen/reported here in Kentucky. Not that scared.
     
  5. forager

    forager 6 pointer

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    planet earth
    Numbers don't matter to the friends and loved ones who lost a loved one to a bear attack. These were people, not statistics.

    The habituation of bears is a problem. Demanding that people spend money on expensive trash cans is playing the blame game. Not everyone has expendable income to bear proof their property. Empowering those who live in bear country to clean up food waste is a step. Suggesting that hunters stop leaving out corn and deer feeders is a slippery slope. Most of these people who tell landowners how to live are not personally affected by bears: they go back to their homes and apartments and wash their hands of the situation. The disconnect between environmentalists and the actual environment grows larger everyday.

    Yes, take precautions, use common sense to avoid human/bear interactions. We have just as much right to be in the woods as the wildlife. When you are attacked by a bear, defend yourself and lawyer up. Bear lives matter in conservation biology, and so do humans.
     
  6. wprebeck

    wprebeck 10 pointer

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    Regarding the feeders- I'd as soon see the practice banned, due to CWD and other potential health issues. The disease is in virtually every bordering state, and only a matter of time before it is detected here. While I do make use of corn from time to time, the health of the deer herd would be better off without it.

    As far as the rest of your post - if you choose to live in bear country, there are certain things you must do. Feel free to move, if the expense of a trash can is too much. Besides, I hear there's no jobs in the country, right?

    Emotional appeals aside, bears simply aren't that much of a threat. Don't hear much about tourists in Gatlinburg being eaten, yet bears are routine visitors kn public areas down there.

    Personally, I'd worry (and do) much more about bipedal predators in the field than anything else out there. Humans kill each other way more than any species of animal ever will.
     
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  7. mountain hunter

    mountain hunter Spike

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    Jan 17, 2010
    Bell County Ky
    I leave in an area and hunt in an area where bears call home. I would agree that most bears would turn and run if confronted by a person. I guess 98-99% of the time that is what they do. Their is a small chance though that they could attack for whatever reason, (they feel threatened, protecting their young, defending a food source) but more than likely they won't be a problem.

    With that being said I usually carry a weapon with me most of the time when in the woods. It could be a full sized handgun or even a shotgun as I feel either would stop an attack of a bear if needed. Killing a bear is to me the last option.

    Coming from personal experience I have walked up on a bear at night in our barn. It was eating honey racks from an old honey bee hive that we had extracted. Luckily the back door to the barn was open and the bear went out the back. When I stepped out the back I was face to face with the bear at less than five yards. It didn't run off just slowly kept walking. I did the same, slowly backing up before I got to a point where I knew the bear could not see me from the other side of the barn and ran home about 100 yards to tell my dad. He went back up and the bear was gone. This incident happened around 20 years ago and this incident showed what most bears would do. Saying that, the bear could have easily reacted differently or the back door could have been shut and I could have unknowingly trapped the bear in the barn with me and the incident could have easily been worse. Either way I have hunted and lived close to bears for the most of my life and have never really felt threatened by their presence. I would carry a gun if I could but also know that in most cases it should never be used and the first shot should be a warning shot as that more than likely would scare the bears off.

    I don't think anyone would be upset with someone who uses a weapon to kill a bear that is hurting him or herself or someone else for that matter. Human life is much more important than the life of that animal. This is not saying the life of that animal is not important it is just that the animal is not as important as that person. In all reality situations like this should only come about in rare circumstances and I hope for anybody reading this that any and all interactions with a person and a bear is safe for the person and the bear alike. Unless you are hunting then good luck with harvesting an animal of your choice.
     
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  8. forager

    forager 6 pointer

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    planet earth
    Humans are the most dangerous animal in the woods, I agree.

    As far as deer feeders go, if they are banned, what other attractants will come next? Salt blocks, soybean fields? Will natural mineral licks have to be covered up?

    Regarding bear proof trash cans. They are expensive. Here is an example of what they cost.
    https://www.amazon.com/Toter-025B96-R1BKS-Residential-2-Wheeled-Blackstone/dp/B00DPJNA00

    The landowner/tenant should feel free to stay where they are. Not everyone wants to live in a city with all the urban issues that people have to deal with.

    Living around venomous snakes is an issue that some people deal with. Only a few tree huggers get upset if a landowner kills a copperhead or rattler near their home, but woe to someone who wants to defend their property from an aggressive bear! You can clean up your property, but occasionally a venomous snake will crawl on your driveway where pets and kids play.

    A fed bear is a dead bear, and habituated animals don't always relocate well, so they have to be removed from the population. Taking a problem animal somewhere else just creates a problem for someone else.

    There are problem bears in Gatlinburg. My friend who lives there tells me about them on occasion.

    Unfortunately, this is not the case:

    http://tdn.com/news/local/peta-plan...cle_306df04c-3a0f-11e4-a952-6333847bad51.html
     
  9. Marsh CallUser

    Marsh CallUser 10 pointer

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    Bowling Green, KY
    Bear spray will be a good investment. With a 9mm, you're more likely to piss it off than kill it. But it will work with meth heads. Good luck in the woods. And look up a Natureboy Rick Flair video to understand the joke in the quoted post, below.


     
  10. forager

    forager 6 pointer

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    Just make sure that you know the direction of the wind. You could become the recipient of the spray and the bear attack.
     
  11. Marsh CallUser

    Marsh CallUser 10 pointer

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    May 20, 2011
    Bowling Green, KY

    Truth!
     
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  12. forager

    forager 6 pointer

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    planet earth
    This is what troubles me: people buying self defense items with no training how to use them. I have talked to so many folks who buy pepper spray who have never deployed it. They have no idea how gross motor skills work over fine motor skills in a survival situation.

    The same goes for gun owners who buy something for "home defense," then keep it in a drawer or under a pillow and have never fired it. Defending oneself takes training. In the case of using a firearm, it takes time at the range, and bullets aren't cheap.

    Just because you use a gun or bear spray on a bear doesn't mean that the animal will be deterred. It is a false sense of security when faced with a reality that none of us want.
     
  13. wprebeck

    wprebeck 10 pointer

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    Louisville, KY.
    Have you ever deployed OC, and if so, in what capacity? Ever been exposed, for that matter?

    Just curious.
     
  14. Coot_Meurer

    Coot_Meurer 10 pointer

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    Nov 4, 2006
    Not here anymore
    Wow - there sure are some bear-phobic folks out there.

    We have a lot more bears here in NC than there are in KY. Our deer lease has enough that we can't put out feeders or they get trashed, usually within the day. For all practical purposes a black bear is a jumbo sized raccoon. Can they hurt you, yes. Do they - almost never. I wear a pistol on the lease, but I also wear knee high rubber boots. I am much more worried about snakes than I am bears. I've actually had a snake strike or two, never yet had a bear attack (or heard of one in NC). The only bear attacks close by were in the TN part of the Smoky Mtn National Park and those are human habituated, garbage eating, unhunted bears.
     
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  15. forager

    forager 6 pointer

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    What is OC?

    I'm not afraid, just cautious and respectful.

    Venomous snakes don't trouble me, but I know the damage that they can do to a dog or person if an envenomation occurs.

    Problems with habituated bears are occurring in the NC mountains. I have met several hikers who were followed and charged by bears, and one camper who followed bear safety protocol in the backcountry who had his tent and gear torn up by a bear. Certain areas in western NC are closed to camping because of of some people's bad choices and aggressive bears. They are hunted there, and still dangerous encounters happen.
     

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