Chestnut trees

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by nock, May 4, 2014.

  1. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    The American chestnut,just like the Dunstan, will flower very quickly in full sun, but slowly in the forest. 3-5 years for pollen and usually 5-7 for burs/nuts when started from a nut. The Dunstans are coming out of Florida and are quite large when sent out for sale.
     
  2. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    The Dunstan are not 98% American, closer to or over 50%. They advertise them as American. To get a tree tht is 98% American they would need to cross Chinese with American for a 50/50 tree and then keep crossing the offspring with a pure American again multiple times, using controlled pollination. They open pollinated their trees so there is no way to know the exact % of A/C but is should be around 50/50. This is what The American Chestnut Foundation has been doing for over 30 years with their hybrid trees and only have a 15/16 tree or 94% American 6% Chinese, but using controlled pollination.
     
  3. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    An American Chestnut planted in the open where there is no blighted trees around it will usually grow to be big enough to flower. The bigger the tree and the more bark area the more likely is is to get a blight spore on it. The tree is something like a net to catch a spore and the bigger it gets the more likely it will get infected. Many of the trees being sold as blight resistant are now getting big enough that they are dying from the blight, but people still keep buying them. And the sellers keep saying that they have never had one die from the blight. Even a pure Chinese tree can die from the blight.
     
  4. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    Send me an email and I will send you an article on the Dunstan breeding program. It is too large for me to attach here. fajknichols.75@gmail.com
     
  5. carnivore

    carnivore 12 pointer

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    California ky
    Allen, to your knowledge are any of the remaining survivors naturally blight resistant (one in a million genetic variance) or did they somehow avoid blight by their location?
     
  6. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    The blight killed all the American chestnut in the native range. There are some tree that are blight free on the West coast that people planted there. All the trees we find are from root sprouts, as the chestnut trees are not self pollinating they almost never get big enough to flower and have another tree close by that is also flowering for a pollinator, so that they produce fertile nuts. The biggest resprouts that we find are usually isolated with no adjacent blighted trees, as in an area with many resprouts the blight is like a smouldering fire and quickly infects any trees in the area.

    If there had been any trees that were blight resistant we would not have lost the tree or been working 30 years to produce one. People say they probably cut down any blight resistant trees when the blight came through thinking they would all die anyawy. But, a blight resistant tree would have resprouted and grown to a full size tree without getting the blight and they would not have been cutting down small saplings anyway and none of them survived by being blight resistant.
    The transgenuic tree devekloped by SUNY-ESF is the only American chestnut that is blight resistant. All other trees are only potentially blight resistant, as even the Chinese tree gets the blight and gets cankers, as that is where the blight came from.
    If you send me an email I can send pictures and information, as most of my attachments and pictures are too large to post. fajknichols.75@gmail.com 4.jpg
     
  7. aaronc

    aaronc 6 pointer

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    Jul 21, 2009
    Leitchfield
    Allen,
    Great pics of the deer,...not only are you a wealth of info on the chestnut but you like to kill stuff too. Stick around here.
     
  8. reivertom

    reivertom 12 pointer

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    Greenup Co.
    I understand that the death of the American Chestnut really helped decimate the wildlife population and the Whitetail was one of the ones it hurt the most. The original deer herd was holding on even after years of no management and unscrupulous hunting practices, but the Chestnut blight was the nail in the coffin. Old timers told me of some places where the original deer herd was still surviving, but they were very few and far between. Can you imagine how big the deer would be if they had all the chestnuts they wanted to eat......not to mention bears?
     
  9. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    This big???? This link has a great history.

    The big advantage of the American chestnut over the oak is that the chestnut does not flower until July so they are not damaged by a late frost so always have nuts every year.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    There are no known trees that survived the blight, in the native range. there are some on the West Coast that people planted that have not got the blight. But, often an isolated sprout from an old stump will get big enough to flower before the blight kills it again. But, those trees are genetically identical to the stump they sprout from, which was not blight resistant.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. slickhead slayer

    slickhead slayer 12 pointer

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    VP OF ADMIN Development
    Allen, what about the American Chestnut in Adair co ky that forestry people have artificially pollinated, or collected pollinated flowers or whatever it is they do with it every year.
    Is it blight resistant, and if not how did it make it?
     
  12. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    There are a lot of resprouts that get big enough to flower, but just like the original tree stump they came from they are not blight resistant. We find mumerous trees tht get to around 17-20"DBH before getting the blight again, but they all get it and die quickly. the bigger a tree is/gets the more likely a spore will land on thebark and get established and then kill the tree. Harry Chestnut 2.jpg Phillips chestnut tree.jpg
     
  13. SmokeShow

    SmokeShow 8 pointer

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    Nov 11, 2013
    So there's no chemical injection or any topical treatment that can be applied to chestnut trees prior to getting blight that would help it fight off or be immune to it? That seems strange.
     
  14. Allen Nichols

    Allen Nichols Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2017
    Laurens, NY
    I have been working on using Agrifos, now called Garden Phos, with injectors and plan to use it with pentabark next year. The injectors work but damage the trees and I can not treat small resprouts with them.http://ucanr.edu/sites/rizzolab/files/142977.pdf
    If you email me I will send you pictures of trees that I treated, that completely healed for 3 years. fajknichols.75@gmail.com
    http://www.thetreegeek.com/wp-content/uploads/TreeGeek_AgriFosProductGuide.pdf
    https://www.domyownpestcontrol.com/...MIkpewy_-g1wIVz5PtCh0UPgJ4EAQYAiABEgJhAfD_BwE
     
  15. Scoony

    Scoony 6 pointer

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    Nov 7, 2003
    Radcliff
    Years ago while hunting Taylorsville lake area, I was walking through an area where a farm used to be and was finding chestnuts on the ground. Did not know that deer liked them so much. As for the trees, I really don't remember what they looked like, but I was surprised to find the chestnuts. Going ot have to go back and find that spot now.
     

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