Hunter numbers declining and so is $$ for wildlife conservation

Discussion in 'General Hunting' started by elkguy, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

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    Shelby county
    YES Already seeing it. More and more hunting public land than before. OOS hunters to. That is just about all it is going to be unless you can afford a lease or own your own land.
     
    forager likes this.
  2. luvtohunt

    luvtohunt 8 pointer

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    Sep 1, 2011
    Eubank, Ky
    Had a hunting camp and several farms in Western part of the state that we hunted when I was a kid for years. I think the most expensive lease was $100 dollar bill. Those days are gone. Big money came in at $25-35 per acre offerings from OOS guys. Lost all of our farms in the course of 3-4 years. Can't blame the farmers though that's good money. All we did was help around on the farm for the most part. Its unfortunate but its part of hunting.
     
  3. EC

    EC 12 pointer

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    Louisville, KY.
    Yep. I think a lot of it has to do with the lack of respect for others' property and some sense of entitlement. I can't blame farmers denying access--especially since this culture has, it appears collectively, a complete lack of respect and care of the farmer's property.

    Cripes, my parents would give me a 10 minute lecture on private property respect if I even opened a car door too close to another car in a parking lot. Doesn't seem now people even give a damn.
     
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  4. INKYHUNTER

    INKYHUNTER Cyber-Hunter

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    Bowling Green, KY, USA.
    Congrats to your parents!
     
  5. WaterDog88

    WaterDog88 10 pointer

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    Kentucky
    I read this the other day. Sad to say but I've got several friends who have hung it up in the past few years. Land access, and being involved in their kids sports are the two biggest reasons.
     
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  6. Tufrthnails

    Tufrthnails 10 pointer

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    Oct 27, 2014
    Lakeland, FL
    I have to say I feel for you KY Locals that have been displaced by big $$$ OOS. I would not be hunting KY if I didn't have family with land that I started hunting. That being said I have fallen in love with KY public land. You guys are blessed with some phenomenal public land. I understand completely that you feel the numbers have dropped of the herd in places. Coming from someone that only hunts public land in FL the numbers of deer I have seen and lack of hunter pressure (in comparison to FL) is awesome. Now to be fair I have only hunted or scouted 5 KY WMA's in western KY. I plan to spend my first week of my 2 week rutcation on KY public land again this year and many to come. Originally I thought a lot of you were crazy with the numbers yall were were reporting people paying until my cousin moved and his neighbor was leasing 140 acres to 5 ohio guys and they were paying $5500 for deer season only. He showed me some pics of bucks they had killed over the last 4 years and yeah they were decent several 150's one 160, but the rest were 120-140".
     
  7. davers

    davers 10 pointer

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    Kentucky
    I know several former Hunters, in my county, that have given-up the sport. Mostly due to losing their hunting property and where most of the land in my county is posted NO HUNTING. I am glad I own my own hunting property, the only way to insure of having a place to hunt.
     
    DH13 likes this.
  8. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

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    Jan 13, 2012
    Shelby county
    YEP I posted the same above. Either Public land or own any more. As Tufrthnails, said above more and more OOS hunters are using the WMAs more. A poster on here the other day asked ARE WMAs getting more crowded??? I said YES. Because that is all most people have any more and more and more are putting in for DRAW HUNTS.
     
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  9. davers

    davers 10 pointer

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    Jul 14, 2014
    Kentucky
    When I was an out-of-state Hunter, I hunted on private land for 15 years here in Kentucky. Before, I hunted a few times in L.B.L. when I got drawn.
     
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  10. xbokilla

    xbokilla 12 pointer

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    Man I feel lucky when I read this. I don’t have ideal places to hunt but they are private land and we don’t pay. Some nice people still out there I guess.
     
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  11. Lack of respect says a lot. It only takes a farmer one time to get burnt to leave a bad taste in his mouth. Nobody likes to knock on doors anymore or knows how to approach a landowner about asking permission to hunt. Trading off working hands for permission to hunt. Talking to a farmer/landowner and not feeding him a line of crap that he can see right through. Don't drive up in your brand new leased pickup and park next to his old rusted farm truck. Asking permission to even talk to him will go a long way. Don't dare interrupt his working day. If you can't catch him out of the field make it a point to come back later or another day. And by all means assure him of the state law that releases him or her of any liability during any sportsman activity on the property.
     
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  12. xbokilla

    xbokilla 12 pointer

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    Jun 28, 2012
    I’ve actually offered to pay/lease to the people who let us hunt and they get mad at me. There like “No no you just enjoy yourself and be careful. There are some places that are hard to access for them but easy for trespassers and I think they like knowing someone is keeping an eye out.
     
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  13. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

    5,640
    1,164
    Jan 13, 2012
    Shelby county
    The place I Duck here at home. The people who own is the same way. It isn't the best place but I get a few birds but it is also the only place I have here at home to hunt Ducks. Been hunting it since 1992. Helped them in Tobacco first and got permission to hunt it. Then after the first year I bought a country ham and took over BUT they wouldn't take it. Said no you don't owe us anything. We are just glad you enjoy yourself. Every year including this year many stop and ask about hunting the pond. They tell em NO we have a man been here for years. He treats as his own and we don't have nothing to worry about. IM GREATFULL FOR IT. The old man who owns it is 87 now and I know he could die sometime. But his son also lives on the farm has assured me if his Das passes away I still have a place to hunt.
     
  14. PUBLIC RAT

    PUBLIC RAT Spike

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    Feb 18, 2014
    I too have 2 boys that i tried to get them in the woods. Never could get them hooked on my passion. Even went in the middle of the day just to get them out. If they didn't hear a gobble or see a deer within 30 minutes it was always the same question. When are we gonna go.
     
  15. forager

    forager 8 pointer

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    planet earth
    We are not the first people to lose our ancestral ways to society's whims of comfort, convenience and apathy:

    "I wanted to give something of my past to my grandson. So I took him into the woods, to a quiet spot. Seated at my feet he listened as I told him of the powers that were given to each creature. He moved not a muscle as I explained how the woods had always provided us with food, homes, comfort, and religion. He was awed when I related to him how the wolf became our guardian, and when I told him that I would sing the sacred wolf song over him, he was overjoyed. In my song, I appealed to the wolf to come and preside over us while I would perform the wolf ceremony so that the bondage between my grandson and the wolf would be lifelong. I sang. In my voice was the hope that clings to every heartbeat. I sang. In my words were the powers I inherited from my forefathers. I sang. In my cupped hands lay a spruce seed-- the link to creation. I sang. In my eyes sparkled love. I sang. And the song floated on the sun's rays from tree to tree. When I had ended, it was if the whole world listened with us to hear the wolf's reply. We waited a long time but none came. Again I sang, humbly but as invitingly as I could, until my throat ached and my voice gave out. All of a sudden I realized why no wolves had heard my sacred song. There were none left! My heart filled with tears. I could no longer give my grandson faith in the past, our past. At last I could whisper to him: " It is finished!" "Can I go home now?" He asked, checking his watch to see if he would still be in time to catch his favorite program on TV. I watched him disappear and wept in silence. All is finished!
    by Chief Dan George (chief of the Salish Band in Burrard Inlet, B.C.)
    Chief Dan George was born Geswanouth Slahoot, on July 24, 1899, in North Vancouver, B.C. and died September 23, 1981, Vancouver, BC"

    http://www.whitefeather.org/chief.htm
     

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