Hunter safety course

Discussion in 'General Hunting' started by jbake74, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. jbake74

    jbake74 6 pointer

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    Oct 16, 2010
    My little girl is 5 and I have had her shooting B.B. guns and a small bow. There is a hunter safety course close to us next month. Do you guys think she would be to young? I know she probably won’t be able to take everything in at this age but I think she will enjoy it.
     
  2. hoene

    hoene 6 pointer

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    !0 yrs old or older. She may attend but not get her Hunter Safety Card.
     
  3. Meatstick

    Meatstick 8 pointer

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    Got mine when I was 6???
    Been a good many years back tho
     
  4. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

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    Temporary Hunter Education Exemption Permit
    The temporary hunter education exemption permit allows a person to hunt for one year without first completing a hunter education course. The permit will be available online for a $5 fee and is available to both Kentucky residents and nonresidents. “License sales have been going down over the years, and we were looking for a solution to the problem,” said Bill Balda, hunter education supervisor for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    Kentucky’s hunter education law requires all license-required hunters born on or after January 1, 1975 to pass a hunter education course and carry the course completion card when hunting. However, hunters who have the new permit will be exempt from this law for one year from the date of purchase. “We made the permit effective for 12 months from the date of purchase, to give hunters an opportunity to try all the hunting opportunities Kentucky has to offer,” Balda said.

    The permit is available only one time. Once it expires, hunters are no longer exempt and must successfully complete a hunter education course.
    Hunters who carry the permit must be accompanied by a properly licensed adult hunter at least 18 years old who meets the hunter education requirement. The adult must remain in a position to take immediate control of the exempted hunter’s bow or firearm while hunting. Adult supervision is also required for all hunters under the age of 10, and for all firearm deer, elk and turkey hunters 15 and under. “We did not want the accident rate to go up,” said Balda. “Texas began a similar permit in 2004, and there was no increase in hunting incidents.”

    Kids don’t have to take the course until they turn 12 years old, instead of the previous age of 10. Also, kids cannot take the hunter education test until they turn 9. During the three-year window between ages nine and 12, kids have many opportunities to take a course. More than 300 hunter education courses are scheduled throughout Kentucky each year.

    Landowners who are hunting on their own land, and other license-exempt hunters, are not required to take a hunter education course. However, the course is strongly recommended. For complete information on hunter education, call 1-800-858-1549.

    Exceptions
    1. Children under 12 years of age may hunt without a course completion card, but shall be accompanied by an adult of at least 18 years of age. One adult shall not accompany more than two children at one time.
    2. Persons exempt from buying a license are not required to possess a hunter education course completion card (i.e., resident owners of farmlands, tenants, etc.).
     
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  5. rcb216

    rcb216 12 pointer

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    She may not get a card but the information you both get will benifit her. You can’t get to much safety info or education. I say take her. It may just influence her to make a safe decision one day.
     
    gdb likes this.
  6. rme hunter

    rme hunter 8 pointer

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    I don't know that an instructor will let her just sit in on the course. At that age she will have a hard time not getting board.
     
  7. shaman

    shaman 8 pointer

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    Both my sons took Hunter Ed when they were young, 8 and 9. However, right after that, the rules changed, and now you can't take the exam until you are 10. My method back then was to make this something special-- the Hunter Ed card for both kids were the first things they had to make a long term effort to earn.

    I would not take a 5 yr old kid to Hunter Ed. What I would do is Google "hunter ed pdf" and download one of the state-approved texts. They all do a pretty good job, and cover nearly the same material. Outdoor Life Magazine has a good video you can get that also covers a lot of the same material. I'd use those and get her ready. The problem is that the course material is written about 5th grade level. You kid will have to grow into it, but you can start reading stuff to her and explaining stuff. My grandaughter is 6, and she's still not ready for Hunter Ed, but she's already been out with me deer watching and squirrel hunting. She's getting there, and she always talks about it whenever she comes to see me.

    I'd also think twice about getting a 5 yr old actually hunting. I don't mean "don't do it." I just mean reconsider. The reason I say this is that 5 yr old kids generally haven't developed enough to where they fully grasp what's going on. Yes, they may be made to be good, safe hunters, but they may not yet appreciate the bigger life and death issues. I found with my two sons that 8 was about the time that particular lightbulb went on. YMMV.

    Generally speaking, at 5, a kid is going to appreciate going with an adult into the field just as much as hunting themselves. Pulling the trigger is not as important to them. Being with Dad is. This is also a good time to introduce nature to them.

    With my kids, we started at 5 with firearms familiarization. They got a Daisy Training Rifle and went with me for walks in the woods. They had to treat the rifle as though it was real. They had to show proper gun handling skills. This was also about the time we started with air rifles. My sons were with me in the field and in the blind as early as 3, but they didn't actually hunt themselves until 9 and 10.

    Just in the last month, #2 son, Moose said to me that one of the two seminal moments in his life was watching me take a deer in 2001. He was 9. Up until then, it had all kind of felt like a game. This was a reality he had never before contemplated.
    Both my sons took Hunter Ed when they were young, 8 and 9. However, right after that, the rules changed, and now you can't take the exam until you are 10.

    I would not take a 5 yr old kid to Hunter Ed. What I would do is Google "hunter ed pdf" and download one of the state-approved texts. They all do a pretty good job, and cover nearly the same material. Outdoor Life Magazine has a good video you can get that also covers a lot of the same material. I'd use those and get her ready.

    I'd also think twice about getting a 5 yr old actually hunting. I don't mean "don't do it." I just mean reconsider. The reason I say this is that 5 yr old kids generally haven't developed enough to where they fully grasp what's going on. Yes, they may be made to be good, safe hunters, but they may not yet appreciate the bigger life and death issues. I found with my two sons that 8 was about the time that particular lightbulb went on. YMMV.

    Generally speaking, at 5, a kid is going to appreciate going with an adult into the field just as much as hunting themselves. Pulling the trigger is not as important to them. Being with Dad is. This is also a good time to introduce nature to them.

    With my kids, we started at 5 with firearms familiarization. They got a Daisy Training rifle and went with me for walks in the woods. They had to treat the rifle as though it was They had to show proper gun handling skills
     
    Coot_Meurer likes this.
  8. T-wil69

    T-wil69 8 pointer

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    As far as letting kids hunt I believe it is a maturity level deal, my oldest girl killed a few squirrels at the age of 4 with a 4-10 and took her first buck and doe last year with her xbow and .243 right after she turned 5 and she shot 4 squirrels at 77 yards out of a mullbery tree one evening off our porch with a 17hmr, but my youngest one is getting ready to turn 4 and she won’t touch a gun for a while, it’s crazy the maturity levels of the two even being raised in the same house
     
  9. Coot_Meurer

    Coot_Meurer 10 pointer

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    Not here anymore
    I was going to respond but don't know that I can do it any better than Shaman above.

    I was a Hunter Ed instructor and 4H Shooting sports coach. Love to see kids involved but they really don't seem to "get it" until around 9 years old.

    By all means take you child along, but make it fun. Stop and watch bugs and birds. Don't get upset if they are loud and scare game away. Don't let them get chilled or overheated - and bring other entertainment.
     
  10. bird whisperer

    bird whisperer 10 pointer

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    Hog Town USA
    As an instructor I know from experience that before they changed the age requirement we would average at least one child per class that was to young/small in stature to hold let alone shoulder a youth 410. Your child will not need the card or the one year exemption until she turns 12.

    DH13 had already posted this but thought I would highlight the important age part. Coppied from the website.

    Kids don’t have to take the course until they turn 12 years old, instead of the previous age of 10. Also, kids cannot take the hunter education test until they turn 9. During the three-year window between ages nine and 12, kids have many opportunities to take a course. More than 300 hunter education courses are scheduled throughout Kentucky each year.

    https://fw.ky.gov/Education/Pages/Hunter-Education.aspx#temppermit
     
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  11. bgkyarcher

    bgkyarcher 12 pointer

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    Nothing wrong with enrolling her, if you think she will enjoy it. Make it a fun outing, if she gets bored, then leave.
     
  12. shaman

    shaman 8 pointer

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    Jul 20, 2004
    Neave, KY, USA.

    Thanks Coot. I appreciate your appreciation.

    "Getting it" hit my sons differently. #2 son would fall asleep. The sleeping wasn't a problem, but the snoring was. He was also the one that became convinced I was fooling him and that there were no deer anywhere near. He stood up and promptly got busted by the herd of doe that were standing there watching his tirade.

    #3 son, on the other hand, was able to follow me into the blind at 3. I could take a nap and leave him to watch for game. He was also the kid that picked up a turkey call, sat in the back yard and promptly called in two gobblers.

    They've both become great hunters. #1 son, has never taken to the sport. At 28, he's still wondering what we all see in it. He likes to come to deer camp, but never goes hunting.

    #1 grand daughter, age 6, has recently been caught with her tablet with her head under the covers watching Youtube videos of deer hunts. Dad caught her, because he heard "Shoot it! Shoot it!" coming from the bedroom.
     
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  13. thunderstorm

    thunderstorm 8 pointer

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    I think at 5 yrs you risk boring her. Just keep doing what you are doing. If she is interested in hunting later take her to a course when she is closer to 12.
     
  14. 1wildcatfan

    1wildcatfan 12 pointer

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    raised n Bullitt Co.
    5 is way too young for hunters ed IMO.
     
  15. Chilly

    Chilly 10 pointer

    Send her to conservation camp when she is 10.
     
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