Oops! (wrong tags issued)

Discussion in 'General Hunting' started by P. Beyer, Oct 16, 2003.

  1. P. Beyer

    P. Beyer 12 pointer

    5,137
    1
    Dec 12, 2001
    Ballard Co
    <b><font size="5">Montana Mistakenly Issues Yellowstone 'Either Sex' Elk Tags </font id="size5"></b>


    The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Department (FWPD) says it has mistakenly issued 375 either-sex elk permits in a hunting area adjacent to Yellowstone National Park.

    The FWPD mistakenly substituted the words "either sex" for "antlerless" in the hunting regulations and on the permits. As it stands now, the permits allow recipients to shoot trophy bull elk that move north out of Yellowstone into Montana. The permits are valid in the southern end of the Gallatin Range in hunting district 314, north of the park.

    The tags allow hunting of either sex elk from November 20 to December 14, a time when the annual migration out of the park is in full swing.

    The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Commission was told about the problem last week and says it will decide soon whether to fix it, let it stand or establish some kind of compromise



    "It makes no difference whether I got anything; it has to do with how the day was spent"

    Fred Bear
     
  2. raktrakr

    raktrakr Cyber-Hunter

    6,663
    2
    Jan 20, 2002
    central ky
    wow, that a big mistake!


    "If you can learn to be an effective squirrel hunter, you can be a good hunter, period." Herold Knight
     
  3. mossyhorns

    mossyhorns Cyber-Hunter

    1,724
    0
    Dec 10, 2001
    Murray, Kentucky, USA.
    Don't send them folks no eagle eggs!
     
  4. P. Beyer

    P. Beyer 12 pointer

    5,137
    1
    Dec 12, 2001
    Ballard Co
    <b><font size="5">Update:</font id="size5"> </b>


    Montana Lets Elk Permit Mistake Stand
    The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Commission (FWPC) says it's decided against correcting a printing mistake made on elk permits issued near Yellowstone National Park.

    The mistake allows permit holders to shoot bull elk as the animals move out of the park during the winter migration. The permits were originally supposed to limit hunters to "antlerless" elk, but a printing mistake changed the permits to "either sex" elk.

    Montana wildlife officials say they believe herd strength won't suffer, as long as the hunt is monitored closely. If weather conditions put a strain on the elk, or if herd strength does begin to suffer, the FWPC can end the elk season with 48 hours notice.



    "It makes no difference whether I got anything; it has to do with how the day was spent"

    Fred Bear
     

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