New study on turkeys going on now by Ky

Bee

10 pointer
Mar 14, 2005
1,682
The Turkeys for Tomorrow ( sorta new NWTF) conducted a nest study with 14 hens this spring. In Alabama. Yesterday I read a blurb on the result. Only one hen out of the 14 produced any poults. This is exactly the result that the Tall Tmbers study in Ga/Fla produced in a very extensive study done just a couple years ago.

Nest predation Nest Prdation Nest predation
 

Chimpy

8 pointer
Jun 29, 2004
741
Wilder, ky, USA.
Just seems like it has to be some sort of an avian flu or something similar for such a widespread decline. On a positive note, I was putting up a stand yesterday and saw 2 separate flocks of 12 and 10 hens in the 2 hours I was there. However, I also saw a coyote walking right down the gravel driveway as I was leaving.
 

Bee

10 pointer
Mar 14, 2005
1,682
Just seems like it has to be some sort of an avian flu or something similar for such a widespread decline. On a positive note, I was putting up a stand yesterday and saw 2 separate flocks of 12 and 10 hens in the 2 hours I was there. However, I also saw a coyote walking right down the gravel driveway as I was leaving.
Not a disease issue if you belive the science.

The studies had cameras on the hens in the nests. Had transmitter chips in some of the hens and in gobblers too biologists tracked them sail from a distance. So the project at Talltimbers Recorded the predators. Bobcats killed a lot of the hens. Snakes coons and ever other footed egg eater got the eggs.

This in not a bird flu issue if you belive this studies. Predation. That is what the studies show.
 
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KYH5N1

10 pointer
Jan 19, 2008
1,947
In the nightmares of turkeys
Yes, predators! Word is that the commission will still NOT vote to extend trapping season for nest predators. Seems that the Houndsmen and the Trapping Association are against extending any trapping except for beaver? Vote will be Friday, August 26, 2022. Still time to call/e-mail your District Commissioners.
 

KYH5N1

10 pointer
Jan 19, 2008
1,947
In the nightmares of turkeys
Trapping needs to be year around.
I agree! It ain't happening. The Houndsmen and the KY Trappers Association are against it. They've bombarded the commission with comments about disenfranchising non hunting public by not using the hides or meat. Houndsmen are against "decimating " one species to help another. I asked my Commissioner a question. "We can hunt coyotes year round, have we killed every one in KY yet?"
 

Bee

10 pointer
Mar 14, 2005
1,682
I saw this on another forum that is turkeys only. It is a summary of the results of hen mortality studies and the results are worth repeating here

"""
Authors: Hubbard, Garner and Klaas, 1993-1996 study in Iowa. 68% survival for adults, 71% for subadults. Coyotes and red fox were the primary source of predation mortality.

Authors: Kurzejeski, Vangilder and Lewis, 1984-1985 study in Missouri, 44% survival. Predation and poaching were the primary sources of mortality.

Authors: Wright, Paisley, Kubisiak, 1988-1994 study in Wisconsin, 53% survival. Predation was the primary source of mortality.

Authors: Palmer, Hurst, Stys, Smith and Burk: 1987-1990 study in Mississippi, 68% survival, predation was the primary source of mortality.

Authors: Roberts, Coffey and Porter, 1990-1993 study in New York, 50% survival, predation, poaching, hunting, and wounding were primary mortality sources.

Authors: Nguyen, Hamr, and Parker, 1999-2001 study in Ontario, 29% survival.

Authors: Moore, Kilgo, Carlisle, Guynn, Davis, 1998-2001 study in South Carolina, 74% survival with bobcats listed as the primary predator.""""""



From Turkeys for Tomorrow""""""And here is a summary of the Iowa turkey study just completed for the 2022 hen survival and poult production.

, FOR 2022:

- A total of 73 hens were marked last winter.

-As of early August, 27 hens have died for a mortality rate of 38%.

-Of 63 hens available to nest starting on May 1, only 7 nests hatched successfully (i.e., hatched at least one egg; 11% hen success rate).

- Of 33 hens marked with GPS transmitters, 7 hens did not incubate a nest, 17 incubated 1 nest, 8 incubated 2 nests, and 1 incubated 3 nests.


- Most of the nest failure was due to predation, however, one nest failed due to hay mowing and one failed due to abandonment by the hen

-The median day of nest failure was 8 days, and a preliminary nest survival model indicates 50% of nests failed by day 10 of incubation.

-Of the 7 nests that successfully hatched, the average clutch size was 9.9 eggs per nest and the average number of eggs hatched was 7.7 eggs per nest.

-Of the 54 eggs that hatched, 18 poults were observed during poult captures conducted within 1-3 days post-hatch and a total of 12 poults were marked with VHF/radio transmitters.

-During 4-week flush counts for 6 of the 7 hens that hatched a nest, a total of 4 poults remained alive. One hen was not flushed because her transmitter failed prior to the 4-week flush count.

Much like the Alabama survey conducted by Dr. Will Gulsby these results clearly show that there is a serious issue in nesting, hatching of a brood, and the survival of a brood. Through a collaborative effort with TFT various state DNRs and Wildlife Biologists hope to identify trends and statistics that are prevalent in all areas where studies are being conducted. This information will prove vital to decisions that can be made to implement changes needed to help the wild turkey survive and prosper."""""
 
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HCDH66

6 pointer
Apr 10, 2019
156
Hardin County
We need to temporarily do away with the fall season (or at least allow no hens to be taken in the fall), limit the spring season to one bird, and move the spring season back a couple of weeks. I wish we didn't have to do any of this. However, if we do not, we may not have turkeys to hunt in the future. Also, we need to open trapping season up year-round.
 

bigbonner

12 pointer
Aug 5, 2015
4,364
F&W asked me if I would let them tag some turkeys and I said yes. If they do that it will be latter this year.
I am not sure what tags will be put on them
 


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