Where is the sport headed?

Little FR

12 pointer
Nov 10, 2021
4,156
West Kentucky
There is a difference in taking a deer. If hunters decide to take any deer they see and over kill, the area population will suffer and then they will start complaining that they have no deer to hunt.
Be sensible and take does if there are plenty.
Would you take a mature doe? I believe I would rather take a yearling doe. If I let the mature doe pass then she will more than likely produce more for next year while a yearling may take another year to breed.
I shoot the smartest and oldest I can get a bead on. Those are the ones that blow at you. Perpetuation of species be danged.
 

Tankt

12 pointer
Dec 26, 2019
4,886
Kentucky
If it's brown, it's down lol. Not normally 100% true but at this time of year it is. Small 70-100" buck gonna eat fine just like a doe. But if my freezer is almost full, I won't shoot a small buck. If that bothers any Horn hunter I will try not to lose any sleep over it.
 

WildmanWilson

12 pointer
Dec 26, 2004
12,399
Western Ky.
Well...... you brought it up and seems hypocritical cause you are judging hunters on what they shoot. So you're going to look down on me if I want to shoot a spike or 2 1/2 yr old 100" deer to fill the freezer? Why do/or should you care what anyone shoots, as look as bag limits are followed? What you shoot has no bearing on my hunt, and what I shoot will have no bearing on your hunt.
I think you added more to my reply than was in there. I said I will never belittle anyone for what they take. I said it’s frustrating to me. I think everyone is free to take what they want with their tag. But what people take does affect me. If all the neighbors shoot every one year old in the area it is going to keep the age structure off balance. No difference in keeping every legal bass in a pond. It’s going to make it harder to grow one 7 pounds.

Now if you can find a single post where I looked down on another hunter on this forum for an animal they tagged, I’ll apologize but you’re not going to find it. I don’t see myself as a hypocrite for wanting some bucks have an opportunity to grow older though.
 

FF/EMT516

10 pointer
Nov 22, 2020
1,105
Caneyville, Ky
I think you added more to my reply than was in there. I said I will never belittle anyone for what they take. I said it’s frustrating to me. I think everyone is free to take what they want with their tag. But what people take does affect me. If all the neighbors shoot every one year old in the area it is going to keep the age structure off balance. No difference in keeping every legal bass in a pond. It’s going to make it harder to grow one 7 pounds.

Now if you can find a single post where I looked down on another hunter on this forum for an animal they tagged, I’ll apologize but you’re not going to find it. I don’t see myself as a hypocrite for wanting some bucks have an opportunity to grow older though.
Fwiw I think Wildman seems to be a super nice guy
 

Ezelkyhunter

10 pointer
Nov 28, 2013
1,505
I remember early years of deer hunting and check stations. It was more fun and more rewarding. Antler envy wasn’t what it is today.

Any deer is a trophy. Literally any deer.

I hope to kill a 170 someday but I don’t like my chances for a lot of reasons. But when the sun starts to rise and I hear the crunch of leaves. Oh boy it gets the blood going.
 

NOCAMST

8 pointer
Oct 9, 2017
563
Central ky
I don’t understand why anyone cares what people think about how big of a deer they kill? I personally like to try and shoot mature deer but i could care less what anyone thinks about what I shoot. I hunt for myself and myself only. I say shoot what ever makes you happy within the legal bag limits and don’t worry about what anyone else thinks or shoots.
 

bigbonner

12 pointer
Aug 5, 2015
4,624
You have to be responsible with hunting, Some of you seem to say if it is brown it goes down.
Lets look at that theory. Take farms where the Amish have bought. If it is brown or has feathers it goes down.
The neighboring farms are hurt from over hunting. Just ask anyone who owns land next to a Amish owned farm.
I say take deer if you have plenty but let some go if you don't. You have to look out for future deer hunting.
Kill them all this year and next year you will be crying about not having any deer to hunt.
 

ky.longbeard

10 pointer
May 15, 2010
1,631
I agree with you. And I keep saying hunting is turning into a rich man’s sport. I have a family member who hunts the same spot year after year, dumps truck bed full of corn at a time next to a knee high clover field and calls it hunting. And hasn’t killed a deer in years because none are big enough for him. He don’t understand that these old deer are as big as they’ll ever get and will die of old age or hit by a car or something but God forbid ole nephew comes over and culls one he will probably never see again. Sorry for the rant. Lol
You and Wildman Wilson both hit the nail on the head . The rich man has bought big farms and then try and buy all the land that surround the farm.The average Joe is on his way out.The average guy can't compete with the $$$$$.....!
 

FF/EMT516

10 pointer
Nov 22, 2020
1,105
Caneyville, Ky
You and Wildman Wilson both hit the nail on the head . The rich man has bought big farms and then try and buy all the land that surround the farm.The average Joe is on his way out.The average guy can't compete with the $$$$$.....!
It’s the truth. It’s hard for guys like me who have a family, to go out and hunt if you didn’t get in the game and get on some land before it was all leased out to the highest bidder. Realistically yes I can buy corn for deer for hunting. But when I buy it I always think to myself, I’m gonna buy this corn, pour it on the ground and may not even see a nice buck. Which is ultimately what I’m after. I’ve always been a meat hunter up until this year when I was fortunate enough to buy a calf dirt cheap and feed it out for the freezer so I could be picky this year.
 

Tankt

12 pointer
Dec 26, 2019
4,886
Kentucky
I can't help but try to rationalize pouring $48 of corn on the ground. I figure gas and corn prices and try to figure how much meat I need to justify it. I honestly cannot help myself lol. I know I shouldn't be like this but it's so natural for me
 

Rob

Cyber-Hunter
Dec 9, 2001
1,814
Murray, KY, USA.
Twenty years ago, all I had to hunt, within a reasonable distance, was public land. I know that works out for some but it never worked for me. Then, a little postage stamp sized farm about 10 miles from my house came up for sale. It was 95% woods, had been recently logged, & was fairly priced. I got a mortgage & bought it. I worked extra hours, carried a PBJ or boloney sammich for lunch when other folks I work with would eat out, ate most meals at home, drove the same pickup when others traded for new ones, part of the time worked two jobs, & looked for any other way to make/save money I could think of, and paid the little farm off. Last Tuesday, I got up early & went there to hunt. Four does came by in a group & I shot the largest. She is going to help feed my family.

I realize not everyone can buy their own land, but a lot of folks could if they made it a priority. Farm land is expensive but scrub land like I have can still be found for a reasonable amount, if you are patient. It took me several years to find my little farm & several more years to pay it off. Finally, land is a great investment. I could easily sell this farm of mine for 3 times what I paid but I'm going to just hang on to it & let it appreciate in value while I enjoy it it.
 

woodsman92

10 pointer
Feb 16, 2019
1,878
Russell Co
Twenty years ago, all I had to hunt, within a reasonable distance, was public land. I know that works out for some but it never worked for me. Then, a little postage stamp sized farm about 10 miles from my house came up for sale. It was 95% woods, had been recently logged, & was fairly priced. I got a mortgage & bought it. I worked extra hours, carried a PBJ or boloney sammich for lunch when other folks I work with would eat out, ate most meals at home, drove the same pickup when others traded for new ones, part of the time worked two jobs, & looked for any other way to make/save money I could think of, and paid the little farm off. Last Tuesday, I got up early & went there to hunt. Four does came by in a group & I shot the largest. She is going to help feed my family.

I realize not everyone can buy their own land, but a lot of folks could if they made it a priority. Farm land is expensive but scrub land like I have can still be found for a reasonable amount, if you are patient. It took me several years to find my little farm & several more years to pay it off. Finally, land is a great investment. I could easily sell this farm of mine for 3 times what I paid but I'm going to just hang on to it & let it appreciate in value while I enjoy it it.
If you had the credit could you buy a piece of farmland lease the crops on it and lease the hunting rights and it pay for itself until you could afford to stop leasing the hunting? It would be a free food plot. I think this would almost work, it’s just a big startup cost and investment with the price of land that is good enough to run crops on
 

bigbonner

12 pointer
Aug 5, 2015
4,624
If you had the credit could you buy a piece of farmland lease the crops on it and lease the hunting rights and it pay for itself until you could afford to stop leasing the hunting? It would be a free food plot. I think this would almost work, it’s just a big startup cost and investment with the price of land that is good enough to run crops on
If the farm had enough crop land and you bought it really cheap.
Lets say you bought 100 acre at $4500 per acre that is $450,000
Crop land rental at $150 per acre is $15000 Providing the whole 100 acres was crop able.
$20 per acre hunting lease is $2000

That is $17,000 potential income
Take interest, taxes and liability from that
You are looking at 30 years $2650 per month payment and you would have to have 10% down around $45,000 as a down payment.
12 months times $2650 = $31,800 per year.
 

Little FR

12 pointer
Nov 10, 2021
4,156
West Kentucky
If you had the credit could you buy a piece of farmland lease the crops on it and lease the hunting rights and it pay for itself until you could afford to stop leasing the hunting? It would be a free food plot. I think this would almost work, it’s just a big startup cost and investment with the price of land that is good enough to run crops on
I have enough credit to buy anything I want. The way things are right now though I can’t justify going into debt. I’ll just keep saving.
 

bgkyarcher

12 pointer
Aug 23, 2011
20,022
BG
If the farm had enough crop land and you bought it really cheap.
Lets say you bought 100 acre at $4500 per acre that is $450,000
Crop land rental at $150 per acre is $15000 Providing the whole 100 acres was crop able.
$20 per acre hunting lease is $2000

That is $17,000 potential income
Take interest, taxes and liability from that
You are looking at 30 years $2650 per month payment and you would have to have 10% down around $45,000 as a down payment.
12 months times $2650 = $31,800 per year.
Not sure where you are, but you're not going to buy anything around here near that cheap, if it is tillable.
 


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